Spirit Box recording.

M.D.K

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Last month some time I recorded this, what do you think of it?
Only 5 seconds but I hear 2 to 3 voices.
I have tons of recordings like this, they give near-Instant replies, when I've asked questions on the past.
This one I didn't even say anything and they were talking.

Here's a special one, this is a family member. I don't feel comfortable sharing many of those unfortunately. (No idea if others can hear, I haven't tried those ones before)
 
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titch2k6

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What I hear is:

Shaun (male) - spoken almost in an Irish accent (i.e. Sh-ah-n as opposed to Sh-awn)
Okay (female) - Australian/New Zealand vocal tone
He's dead (male) - Australian/New Zealand vocal tone
Yeah (male) - Vocal tone difficult to make out as so short
 
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M.D.K

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What I hear is:

Shaun (male) - spoken almost in an Irish accent (i.e. Sh-ah-n as opposed to Sh-awn)
Okay (female) - Australian/New Zealand vocal tone
He's dead (male) - Australian/New Zealand vocal tone
Yeah (male) - Vocal tone difficult to make out as so short
This amazes me how people can hear it differently or just hear static thank you for sharing what you heard.
This is definitely very interesting, My confidence on the "You stick with Mike" would be 100% sure.
But after replaying the "It's your uncle" part on a different pitch and tempo it's definitely actually "Shawn"! (I can't believe I got that mixed up! This is embarrassing lol, I think it was the accent that confused me)
Oddly no matter the pitch/tempo it's playing back I always hear "You stick with Mike" the Mike is really "emphasised" IMO
 
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titch2k6

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I have rerun and refiltered, but I still hear he's dead.

I have isolated the clip, applied a bit of equaliser to bring out the tone (20 Band 'dark n dull'), slowed the tempo to 53% and applied some hiss reduction:



I am not questioning what you hear - I am just really interested in how things appear different to some people, despite the recording being the same clip ;)
 
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M.D.K

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I have rerun and refiltered, but I still hear he's dead.

I have isolated the clip, applied a bit of equaliser to bring out the tone (20 Band 'dark n dull'), slowed the tempo to 53% and applied some hiss reduction:



I am not questioning what you hear - I am just really interested in how things appear different to some people, despite the recording being the same clip ;)
I've listened at all kinds of Tempos and pitches.
I've actually picked up on quite a bit more dialog before the selection you found.
What sounded like "You stick with Mike" does in fact change to "He's dead right now" and the "Shawn" part becomes "what did I tell you"
I don't get how slowing the voice down can change what they're saying so much definitely creepy.
For example recordings from who I believe to be a passed love one, do not change with any Tempo changes, but those others do?
 
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Jumping in here as Titch should be sleeping about now.

Sounds don't "change" within a recording, to my knowledge. However, how we interpret them may. Slowing the speed helps us actually hear them more clearly, as we believe entities "speak" at a much faster rate than the living.

There is something called pareidolia. This can occur with vision or hearing. It involves our brains trying to make sense of an object we see or what we are hearing. (Ask my hearing impaired husband how many words he can come up with "hearing" the one word I'm trying to get him to hear!) The brain can reshape sound and visuals to try and make sense of the input.

I will also add in that accents may be involved in the differences in what each of us hears on the recordings.
 
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M.D.K

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Jumping in here as Titch should be sleeping about now.

Sounds don't "change" within a recording, to my knowledge. However, how we interpret them may. Slowing the speed helps us actually hear them more clearly, as we believe entities "speak" at a much faster rate than the living.

There is something called pareidolia. This can occur with vision or hearing. It involves our brains trying to make sense of an object we see or what we are hearing. (Ask my hearing impaired husband how many words he can come up with "hearing" the one word I'm trying to get him to hear!) The brain can reshape sound and visuals to try and make sense of the input.

I will also add in that accents may be involved in the differences in what each of us hears on the recordings.
Ah thank you, that makes sense now since they're speaking much faster, this explains why the recording appears to "change" on me, it's really interesting that the ones I've been able to ID personally as in I knew them comes across much easier for me to hear could this be because I have a "link" with them?
 

titch2k6

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Ah thank you, that makes sense now since they're speaking much faster, this explains why the recording appears to "change" on me, it's really interesting that the ones I've been able to ID personally as in I knew them comes across much easier for me to hear could this be because I have a "link" with them?

I believe that when we hear somebody we have known personally on a recording, we find it easier to identify them as we are more intuned with their energies, and can recognise certain quirks in their voices, such as tones and variances, due to the time we spent with them during their life.
 
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titch2k6

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Jumping in here as Titch should be sleeping about now.

Sounds don't "change" within a recording, to my knowledge. However, how we interpret them may. Slowing the speed helps us actually hear them more clearly, as we believe entities "speak" at a much faster rate than the living.

There is something called pareidolia. This can occur with vision or hearing. It involves our brains trying to make sense of an object we see or what we are hearing. (Ask my hearing impaired husband how many words he can come up with "hearing" the one word I'm trying to get him to hear!) The brain can reshape sound and visuals to try and make sense of the input.

I will also add in that accents may be involved in the differences in what each of us hears on the recordings.

Yes, have to concur with Debi. Sounds cannot change on a recording as they are stored as digital data. What does change is the way that everybody's brain interprets sound at different speeds and frequencies.

We have to remember that sound is just air pressure waves. These waves have to go through the process of activating the ear, which in turn, sends signals to the brain, which in turn interprets the signals being received. In this process, there are so many things that can vary from person to person, which can change what each person perceives the sound as.

This is also why pareidolia exists. When the brain cannot make sense of the data that it is receiving and because the brain is extremely logical (i.e. it will always try to make sense of the signal data it receives), it will 'fill in' anything it cannot comprehend with data it can. Hence we see familiar patterns in clouds up in the sky, and we can hear voices that just are not there in white noise.

Pareidolia is the bane of investigative analysis and even we get caught out on the odd occasion.