Part of the PNF "Learn a New Word" Program

jadamz

the Countess
Tier-1 Mod
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
48,117
Reaction score
29,865
Points
223
Wales is beautiful, I particularly liked Swansea. A colleague from here in the US who visited Wales described it as "West Virginia with castles." The written Welsh language has always fascinated me with its high ratio of consonants to vowels.
I'm a fan of Northern Wales,Had a friend I stayed with in Angelsey. There is an incredible Botanical garden in or near the Conway valley,which is right up there with the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia," Shenandoah" is one of the loveliest words in the English language
 

jadamz

the Countess
Tier-1 Mod
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
48,117
Reaction score
29,865
Points
223
Did you have time to see Snowdonia National Park or visit the Pembrokeshire coast? I also like the Brecon Beacons. Wales has so much to offer and, as you say, is very beautiful. I could listen to a Welsh speaker for hours...even the accent when they speak English, is beautiful.
I worked several times in Llandudno aka Betws-y-coed which is often anglicized to Betsy Coed
Wales is beautiful, I particularly liked Swansea. A colleague from here in the US who visited Wales described it as "West Virginia with castles." The written Welsh language has always fascinated me with its high ratio of consonants to vowels.
. Interesting point Duke about the ratio of Consonants to vowels. I've never thought about the Gaelic influence in that regard as is the other Gaelic influenced areas :Irish,Scottish,Cornish and Manx. They have some strange pronunciations of consonants. One example is Samhain "The pronunciation of Samhain varies depending on the Gaelic language it is where it is pronounced . Samhain is usually pronounced in its Irish version. So the correct pronunciation of Samhain in Irish is Sau-ihn. The first part, -Sau, is pronounced like the "sow", the female of a pig. The second syllable, -ihn, contains an "i" that is pronounced somewhat midway between an "i" and an "e" sound. Samhain is a Gaelic festival of Celtic pagan origins that marks the end of harvest season (Summer) and the beginning of winter, which is celebrated between 31 October and 1 Novembre. i.e Halloween
 

jadamz

the Countess
Tier-1 Mod
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
48,117
Reaction score
29,865
Points
223
Wales is beautiful, I particularly liked Swansea. A colleague from here in the US who visited Wales described it as "West Virginia with castles." The written Welsh language has always fascinated me with its high ratio of consonants to vowels.
yup
 
OP
OP
Duke

Duke

Open-minded critical thinker
Staff
Joined
May 11, 2018
Messages
8,650
Reaction score
14,667
Points
203
Location
Dayton, OH
I worked several times in Llandudno aka Betws-y-coed which is often anglicized to Betsy Coed

. Interesting point Duke about the ratio of Consonants to vowels. I've never thought about the Gaelic influence in that regard as is the other Gaelic influenced areas :Irish,Scottish,Cornish and Manx. They have some strange pronunciations of consonants. One example is Samhain "The pronunciation of Samhain varies depending on the Gaelic language it is where it is pronounced . Samhain is usually pronounced in its Irish version. So the correct pronunciation of Samhain in Irish is Sau-ihn. The first part, -Sau, is pronounced like the "sow", the female of a pig. The second syllable, -ihn, contains an "i" that is pronounced somewhat midway between an "i" and an "e" sound. Samhain is a Gaelic festival of Celtic pagan origins that marks the end of harvest season (Summer) and the beginning of winter, which is celebrated between 31 October and 1 Novembre. i.e Halloween
The Isle of Man, another beautiful place. A number of relatively recent movies set in Ireland, such as "Waking Ned Devine," were actually filmed on Man because "modern" Ireland didn't look Irish enough. The EU development and infrastructure money that started coming in during the late 80s essentially put Ireland on the road to being a first world nation. Of course in doing so it lost a lot of its charm.
 
  • Sad
Reactions: garnetsilver
OP
OP
Duke

Duke

Open-minded critical thinker
Staff
Joined
May 11, 2018
Messages
8,650
Reaction score
14,667
Points
203
Location
Dayton, OH
Graupel:

Also called soft hail, hominy snow, or snow pellets, is precipitation that forms when supercooled water droplets are collected and freeze on falling snowflakes, forming 2–5 mm balls of crisp, opaque rime. Graupel is distinct from hail and ice pellets.