Nessie related to extinct whale?

Lynne

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I like Ken Gerheart but the whale theory is just another idea In the hat if you ask me. There just isn’t enough info.
 
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titch2k6

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As a resident of the UK, I find the whole Nessie story rather interesting. There have been many theories on what Nessie could be, but I think that the potential of it being an extinct whale does not fit the profile of what we perceive as Nessie.

In 2019, the University of Otago undertook a major scientific research program in the Loch where they took over 200 water samples, from various depths, and sequenced all of the DNA found within the samples. Interestingly, they found a massive amount of eel DNA in the water, as they are native to the Loch, and this leads them to believe that Nessie could potentially be an abnormally large species of eel. Now, this I find more plausible than the whale theory. However, the only problem I have with the University's research, is that they compared all of the DNA sequences to KNOWN marine life and potentially, Nessie is a yet unknown species - if it does actually exist.

I say 'if it actually does exist' as, although there have been images caught of something strange within the Loch, there is so little evidence of a beast that resides within the waters. You would expect, with a creature of such size, more sightings to have been reported over the years and unfortunately, there are more hoaxed sightings than there are factual which does not help the whole Nessie argument. There are plausible theories for this though that have been put forward, such as the existence of underwater cave systems that links Loch Ness to other Lochs around, as well as potentially the North Sea and/or the Pacific Ocean. Theorists believe that the beast migrates between the Loch and other expanses of water, which explains the lack of actual sightings. As of yet, this theory has to be proven, but if it is, this would open the way for a monitoring system to be put in place to 'ping' any activity within those caves.

The story of Nessie will continue to fascinate us for years to come and hopefully, as technology progresses further, we will have the capability to undertake a full exploration of the waters, and accurately map out what lays below, to give us more insight into this fascinating story.
 
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ozentity

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Now, this I find more plausible than the whale theory. However, the only problem I have with the University's research, is that they compared all of the DNA sequences to KNOWN marine life and potentially, Nessie is a yet unknown species - if it does actually exist.
You would think it would have DNA similar to other species though, as far as I know most living creature has some DNA in common.
 
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titch2k6

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You would think it would have DNA similar to other species though, as far as I know most living creature has some DNA in common.
I can agree with that. Humans share more than 50% of their genetic information with plants and animals in general. We share about 80% with cows, 61% with bugs such as fruit flies. You'll even find human DNA in a banana – about 60%.
 
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ozentity

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they found a massive amount of eel DNA in the water, as they are native to the Loch,
It may be very closely related to eels with almost the same DNA but as you say an unknown species and they cant differentiate atm.
 
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Lynne

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As a resident of the UK, I find the whole Nessie story rather interesting. There have been many theories on what Nessie could be, but I think that the potential of it being an extinct whale does not fit the profile of what we perceive as Nessie.

In 2019, the University of Otago undertook a major scientific research program in the Loch where they took over 200 water samples, from various depths, and sequenced all of the DNA found within the samples. Interestingly, they found a massive amount of eel DNA in the water, as they are native to the Loch, and this leads them to believe that Nessie could potentially be an abnormally large species of eel. Now, this I find more plausible than the whale theory. However, the only problem I have with the University's research, is that they compared all of the DNA sequences to KNOWN marine life and potentially, Nessie is a yet unknown species - if it does actually exist.

I say 'if it actually does exist' as, although there have been images caught of something strange within the Loch, there is so little evidence of a beast that resides within the waters. You would expect, with a creature of such size, more sightings to have been reported over the years and unfortunately, there are more hoaxed sightings than there are factual which does not help the whole Nessie argument. There are plausible theories for this though that have been put forward, such as the existence of underwater cave systems that links Loch Ness to other Lochs around, as well as potentially the North Sea and/or the Pacific Ocean. Theorists believe that the beast migrates between the Loch and other expanses of water, which explains the lack of actual sightings. As of yet, this theory has to be proven, but if it is, this would open the way for a monitoring system to be put in place to 'ping' any activity within those caves.

The story of Nessie will continue to fascinate us for years to come and hopefully, as technology progresses further, we will have the capability to undertake a full exploration of the waters, and accurately map out what lays below, to give us more insight into this fascinating story.
You summed this up well. I agree the large eel theory makes more sense.
 
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