Mushrooms on Mars?

Duke

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They look like the same thing some claimed were blueberries back in the early 2000s.
The guy who put forth this theory is said to be a bit of a "woo woo" kinda fella. Yet, it's all over the news and even on Drudge.
 

titch2k6

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I believe that life on Mars is a lot more diverse than what we think. We just haven't discovered it yet and considering the vast networks of caves on the planet that we have not yet even started to explore, I believe there are more surprises in store for us.

Ever since we discovered water (in the form of ice, three underground saltwater lakes, and what scientists describe as "intermittent flowing streams") on the red planet, there has always been the potential for life to be discovered, after all, water is one of the essential elements for carbon-based lifeforms to exist (current belief in line with our scientific knowledge).

I think that the "dead planet" is far from that, but only time and further expeditions will determine if that is the case.
 
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Malaria_Kidd IV

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At 135° below zero one could surmise this interesting phenomenon is not living. Nor has there ever been living things on Mars including Martians.

So spend the money just on those cute little wheeled robots. Then print tons of e-mail to help subdue Elon's need to send humans to his "Mars Oasis" where he won't go! Lol


MK IV ∆=⚾
 
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GoneWestUtah

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I'm content to wait and see.

Speculation is just a way to pass time or talk ourselves into believing something. Until we either get a sample returned or send a crewed lab there, it's just interesting banter.
 

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Next they find giant ,,,,
 

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titch2k6

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At 135° below zero one could surmise this interesting phenomenon is not living.

Mars has an average temperature of -80F (-62C) - the same as the lowest temperature recorded in the Arctic Circle back in 1933. And guess what? Things live in the Artic. Yes, the poles in winter can drop to -220F (-140C), but the martian lower latitudes in summer can reach +70F (21C)......

Crack out your sun lounger, factor 5000, and O2 tanks..........!

We keep basing our observations on our knowledge of the earth. Yes, not a lot will grow on earth at such extreme temperatures - but Mars is not earth and we have to think outside the box. If extremophiles (organisms that endure extreme conditions) can survive in space (in 2007, the ESA deliberately launched microorganisms on a Foton-M3 spacecraft and exposed them to the harsh vacuum of space - the lifeforms survived), which is about -455F (-270C), why not life on Mars, which is considerably warmer in comparison and actually has an atmosphere (albeit mainly carbon dioxide (95.32%), nitrogen (2.7%), argon (1.6%), oxygen (0.13%), and carbon monoxide (0.7%) along with some trace noble gasses)?

Mars formed at least 100 million years before the earth, giving any lifeforms (and we are not talking little green men or reptile-like creatures here) on the planet much longer to adapt to conditions on the planet once it started to die. It is known as 'natural evolution'. And Mars did not die suddenly. It is estimated, that through atmospheric bleeding following the loss of its magnetic field approximately 4.2 billion years ago, the planet took around 500 million years to die off.


Just because we have not found any conclusive answers yet, it does not mean that there is not the potential for life, even on a 'dead' planet like Mars.
 
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Lynne

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Mars has an average temperature of -80F (-62C) - the same as the lowest temperature recorded in the Arctic Circle back in 1933. And guess what? Things live in the Artic. Yes, the poles in winter can drop to -220F (-140C), but the martian lower latitudes in summer can reach +70F (21C)......

Crack out your sun lounger, factor 5000, and O2 tanks..........!

We keep basing our observations on our knowledge of the earth. Yes, not a lot will grow on earth at such extreme temperatures - but Mars is not earth and we have to think outside the box. If extremophiles (organisms that endure extreme conditions) can survive in space (in 2007, the ESA deliberately launched microorganisms on a Foton-M3 spacecraft and exposed them to the harsh vacuum of space - the lifeforms survived), which is about -455F (-270C), why not life on Mars, which is considerably warmer in comparison and actually has an atmosphere (albeit mainly carbon dioxide (95.32%), nitrogen (2.7%), argon (1.6%), oxygen (0.13%), and carbon monoxide (0.7%) along with some trace noble gasses)?

Mars formed at least 100 million years before the earth, giving any lifeforms (and we are not talking little green men or reptile-like creatures here) on the planet much longer to adapt to conditions on the planet once it started to die. It is known as 'natural evolution'. And Mars did not die suddenly. It is estimated, that through atmospheric bleeding following the loss of its magnetic field approximately 4.2 billion years ago, the planet took around 500 million years to die off.


Just because we have not found any conclusive answers yet, it does not mean that there is not the potential for life, even on a 'dead' planet like Mars.
Excellent points