Flight/Planes

damon

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Here is a little bit of fun facts about the SR-71 Blackbird.
 

damon

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Here is a little bit of fun facts about the SR-71 Blackbird.
 

Duke

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Hey Duke did you heard about this yet??
Yes, very strange. My initial thought was he'd committed suicide because he broke the plane in the first landing attempt.

When we investigate fatal mishaps in the USAF, part of process includes a review of the fatalities' emotional/psychological/physical status leading up to mishaps, as well as a toxicology screening. This is done to determine if they were distracted, or even possibly suicidal at the time of the mishap. Occasionally we would find something that was judged to be a causal factor in the fatality. I think hope the NTSB does something similar.
 
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damon

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Yes, very strange. My initial thought was he'd committed suicide because he broke the plane in the first landing attempt.

When we investigate fatal mishaps in the USAF, part of process includes a review of the fatalities' emotional/psychological/physical status leading up to mishaps, as well as a toxicology screening. This is done to determine if they were distracted, or even possibly suicidal at the time of the mishap. Occasionally we would find something that was judged to be a causal factor in the fatality. I think hope the NTSB does something similar.
Th NTSB does something very similar to what the Air Force does as well the DoD in general.
 

Duke

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Th NTSB does something very similar to what the Air Force does as well the DoD in general.
I've been to NTSB hearings representing the Air Force. Their investigations are a joke.
 

damon

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I've been to NTSB hearings representing the Air Force. Their investigations are a joke.
Ok, The few that I have seen were ok. I know that the case with Kobe the Basketball player was good. But maybe the higher profiles is when they double check everything. Duke
 

Duke

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Ok, The few that I have seen were ok. I know that the case with Kobe the Basketball player was good. But maybe the higher profiles is when they double check everything. Duke
The first NTSB hearing I attended put me off their processes. The high profile, multiple fatality mishap involved a foreign carrier a/c flying in the US. Every entity that had even a slight role/interest was present/legally represented (air carrier, both the pilots' and flight attendants' unions, the civil aviation authority of the foreign carrier, a/c manufacturer, a subcontractor to the a/c manufacturer, fire department that responded to the mishap, air traffic controllers union, and at least a couple others I can't recall), each trying to fix the blame on one of more of the others. Everyone called to testify was questioned by their legal representative, then cross examined by each of the others (if the opted to do so.) Turned out to be three days of finger pointing by all involved.

The whole exercise is more about CYA and to protect those involved from civil liability than it is air safety. As I was leaving the hearing, I overheard the lawyer representing the flight attendants' union telling the two stews involved, "We're fine, no one presented any evidence that can hurt us." I remember thinking that was probably great comfort to the families of the x number of passengers who died.
 

damon

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The first NTSB hearing I attended put me off their processes. The high profile, multiple fatality mishap involved a foreign carrier a/c flying in the US. Every entity that had even a slight role/interest was present/legally represented (air carrier, both the pilots' and flight attendants' unions, the civil aviation authority of the foreign carrier, a/c manufacturer, a subcontractor to the a/c manufacturer, fire department that responded to the mishap, air traffic controllers union, and at least a couple others I can't recall), each trying to fix the blame on one of more of the others. Everyone called to testify was questioned by their legal representative, then cross examined by each of the others (if the opted to do so.) Turned out to be three days of finger pointing by all involved.

The whole exercise is more about CYA and to protect those involved from civil liability than it is air safety. As I was leaving the hearing, I overheard the lawyer representing the flight attendants' union telling the two stews involved, "We're fine, no one presented any evidence that can hurt us." I remember thinking that was probably great comfort to the families of the x number of passengers who died.
WOW, I should keep an eye on the NTSB more. They should (NTSB) do what the DoD does when there is an aircraft mishap. I guess it just comes down who has the better lawyers then what really happen to prevent and or reduce the chances of the mishap happening again.
 
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